The First Year of Parenting: What I Wish I’d Known — Episode #185 with Vanessa Van Edwards

The First Year of Parenting: What I Wish I’d Known — Episode #185 with Vanessa Van Edwards

Vanessa Van Edwards learned right away that being an expert in behavioral science did not translate into innate parenting know-how. Vanessa joined us earlier to talk about those first few blurry weeks of infancy and babies in Episode #104. Now, she’s opening up about the first year, explaining that while some phases do indeed “go by so fast,” others can feel like a slog, but telling parents that it goes by so fast is not, well, helpful. We dig into the nitty-gritty of the first year of parenting, what surprised us, what we wish we’d known, and the milestones most parenting books miss.

The Chaos And Unpredictability of Birth (Especially In A Pandemic)

The Chaos And Unpredictability of Birth (Especially In A Pandemic)

My first child was born on Mothers’ Day, 2016, the day before our anniversary. It blew me open, ripped my birth canal vagina more than I would have liked, and turned so much of my life upside down. So many of you are about to become mothers for the first, second, third time. You’re doing it in the middle of a pandemic, in the midst of changing rules and ideas, amidst a sea of changing information. Motherhood, in many ways, feels like a pandemic. The strange thing about the last four months is this eerie sense I have that this already feels familiar. I’ve been here before. We’ve been here before.

Parenting Logistics: Why It’s Such A Nightmare — Episode #139

Parenting Logistics: Why It’s Such A Nightmare — Episode #139

Lately I’ve been fielding a lot of questions from people about what to expect in the shift from non-parenting to the parenting world. Personally, I find it really challenging when people smile at you and say things like, “Wait and see,” or “You’ll get it when you become a parent.” No thanks—please tell me now! On this episode, I decided to dive straight into the daily tangle that is the parenting logistics required of managing small humans. It is in these daily nuances—and the morning pitter patter of tiny feet—that our work lives and our careers begin to explode.

Becoming A Parent: Of Course You’re Going To Change

Becoming A Parent: Of Course You’re Going To Change

Everyone tells women to bounce back after having a kid. Like, don’t change—don’t do anything except, of course, become a mom and be a mother 100% and love your kids and leave work because, obviously, you’ll leave work and you won’t be the same. Except also, don’t change. WTF?

ASK SARAH #1: Staying Organized, Rest, And Restoring Yourself

ASK SARAH #1: Staying Organized, Rest, And Restoring Yourself

Did you know we have a brand-new podcast? Ask Sarah: The Podcast is a place for you to ask anything you’d like—about your life, my life, business, parenting, or whatever is on your mind. This is a teaser of our brand new show. In this episode, you asked: What did I do to get my kids to sleep? How do I take care of myself? What do I need to rest and recharge? I also talk about how I’ve added specific restorative practices to my life, and share a glimpse inside my partnership and how my partner and I try to make time for each other with two kids—not an easy feat.

The Myths of Miscarriage, The Lean In Fallacy, and Mothers’ Rage — Episode #115 With Katherine Goldstein

The Myths of Miscarriage, The Lean In Fallacy, and Mothers’ Rage — Episode #115 With Katherine Goldstein

Katherine Goldstein found our she was pregnant as she was trying to launch a podcast about how mothers experience bias and discrimination in the workplace—making the issue front and center in her life. Yet she experienced trauma and blowback despite the knowledge. Today we still force women to wrap their miscarriage and fertility traumas into a bow—“But now I have a baby, so it’s all okay”—to make it palatable to the public. Award-winning journalist and podcast creator Katherine Goldstein goes deep with us on so many of the most pressing topics for working mothers and holds nothing back. Between her research, the data, her own experience, and her reported experience of hundreds of moms, Katherine is waging war against cultural forces holding mothers back from being their fullest, most ambitious, most rage-filled selves.

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